Openness, Equality and Inclusion

three flags with the words: community, Equality, Diversity

A collection of resources focussing on openness, equality and inclusion developed by the Open.Ed service.


The Long View: Changing Perspectives on OER

OER18 Conference keynote by Lorna M. Campbell.  In this talk Lorna explores how the OER Conference has examined and renegotiate what “OER” means over the years, and how this has reflected her own journey as an open education practitioner. She also looks at what we can do to ensure that open education is diverse, inclusive and participatory, and using innovative examples from the University of Edinburgh, she explores how we can engage students in open education practice and the co-creation of OER.

The Long View: Changing Perspectives on OER, video (Media Hopper Create), CC BY

The Long View: Changing Perspectives on OER, video (YouTube), CC BY

The Long View: Changing Perspectives on OER, transcript, CC BY

The Long View: Changing Perspectives on OER, slides, CC BY


Exploring the Open Knowledge Landscape

FLOSS UK 2018 Spring Conference keynote.  Through a culture of collaboration and sharing, Open Knowledge has the potential has the potential to expand inclusive and equitable access to education and lifelong learning, promoting technology transfer and innovation, enhancing quality and sustainability, while supporting social inclusion and preparing the public to become fully engaged digital citizens.


The Soul of Liberty: Openness, Equality and Co-Creation

CELT Design for Learning Symposium, keynote by Lorna M. Campbell. What do we mean when we talk about openness in relation to digital teaching and learning spaces, resources, communities and practices?  How open and equitable are our open online education spaces and who are they open to? This talk focused on open education, OER, open practice, MOOCs, and Wikimedia, exploring the different and sometimes contradictory definitions and understandings of openness in these contexts.  It also highlights structural inequalities that prevent some groups and individuals from participating in open education and, using innovative examples from the University of Edinburgh, explores how we can engage with students to co-create more equitable, inclusive and participatory open education spaces, communities and resources.

 

Header Image: Community Equality Diversity, PublicDomainpictures.net, CC0